Beginning Embedded Electronics - 2

  
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Get all the parts for this lecture here. We also highly recommend that you get a multimeter with a `continuity` setting. A good quality multimeter with this setting goes for ~$60 and as high as $300 for a really spectacular one. We like our $60 cheapo. Sorry for the confusion. When these tutorials were written and photographed, we used th
Beginning Embedded Electronics - 2 - schematic

e ATmega8. We now carry the newer ATmega328. You will find all ATmega328 information in the following pages, but the pictures will show an ATmega8. You will need to slightly bend in the legs of the DIP (dual inline package) to get the ATmega to straddle the breadboard center. Be careful! Do not bend the pins too far inward. The pins of the ATmega should insert into the inner two most rows on the breadboard. I find it best to to insert one side and then slightly push the IC sideways until the other side of pins can insert into the opposite row on the breadboard. Confusing, I know. Note: The 5V `rail` is the horizontal row of holes next to the red line. You should have a wire connecting your 5V power regulator circuit to one hole on the 5V rail. This will energize all the holes next to the red line with 5V. This is true about the blue line as well. All the horizontal holes next to the blue line are connected together. One of these holes should be connected to the ground pin on your voltage regulator, and to the ground connection of your wall wart. You can connect the VCC pins on the ATmega328 to any holes along the 5V rail, and you connect the GND pins on the ATmega328 to any hole along the blue GND rail. Oh, hey! If no one ever told you, there is a really simple way to figure out where pin 1 is on an IC. The manufacturer of anything polarized (tantalum caps, electrolytic caps, LEDs, ICs, etc) will always put some sort of...



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