Doorbell Phone

  
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You could really use any phone for this project, so don`t worry if you can`t get or don`t want the same model as mine. If you do get an antique bakelite phone, here are some basic steps for restoration. Clean your phone with a rag dampened in one of those environmentally friendly orange based cleaners. If the bakelite is heavily worn, cracked, or
Doorbell Phone - schematic

sun bleached, you`re out of luck. It`s pretty much impossible to restore bakelite in that condition. Trust me. If your bakelite is dull after cleaning, you might be able to get away with polishing it with black shoe polish. As a last resort some people paint it black (I see a red door), but antique snobs will have a coronary at the mere mention of this. I say if it`s your last resort and you`re not trying to resell the phone as mint condition , go for it. Here`s a good site on bakelite restoration. The painted numbers on my dial were chipping badly so I used a toothpick and some white Testors model paint to touch them up a little. The black paint on the dial was worn just enough to look good but not ratty so I left it the way it was. The chrome (or nickel) on the dial was tarnished so I cleaned it with some generic metal polish that was white and smelled like ammonia. Don`t rub too hard or you might take off the plating, exposing the yellow metal underneath. In the the DE 200 there`s a giant capacitor (labeled condenser ) inside. Capacitors go bad over the years and need to be replaced, and mine was causing the phone to ring weakly. You can try to find an equivalent modern capacitor if you have a schematic for the phone, or go the route I did and just bypass it. Connect the two incoming wires from the wall directly to the coils on the ringer by either soldering them or using alligator clips. I replaced the wall cord with...



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