Interfacing Electronic Circuits to Arduinos

  
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In this instructable I use an example of interfacing an Arduino to an ARINC 429 transceiver in order to demonstrate the general process of interfacing an Arduino to electronic circuits so you can use these techniques on your own designs. An ARINC 429 bus is the most common data bus used on aircraft for computer to computer communications. The ARIN
Interfacing Electronic Circuits to Arduinos - schematic

C 429 bus operates at one of two speeds, called low speed and high speed, which are 12. 5 kbps and 100 kbps respectively. The bus operates over two wires (and a ground). Each piece of data is sent in a 32 bit word. Generally the first 8 bits, called the label, are used to identify the data contained within the ARINC word. Bits 9 and 10 often define the Source/Destination Indicator, but sometimes they contain data or are an extension of the label. Data is contained in bits 11-29 and can contain binary twos compliment, binary coded decimal, and/or a set of discrete bits. Bits 30 and 31 contain the Sign Status Matrix, and its values can indicate Normal operation, Failure Warn, No Computed Data, and Functional Test. Finally bit 32 is the Parity bit and is set so that the 32 bit word has ODD parity. Avionics equipment manufacturers, aircraft manufacturers, and avionics equipment service centers have specialized test equipment to read these ARINC 429 data buses. I`ve wanted to own and use my own test equipment so I developed the Arinc429eReader. While this could be an instructable on its own merit, I suppose the audience interested in such a device would be small. I will therefore present a more generally applicable instructable on the process of interfacing an Arduino to other electronic circuits. In my example I found several companies that make ARINC 429 to USB converters but they are rather expensive, $1500 US dollars or...



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