LCD_controller

  
Inside:
Repository
Clip sync output to TTL level seems to take some more time to fit the extra parts on the board; as a quick fix, put a ZPD4. 7 (4. 7 V Z-Diode) between SGand ground at the POWERswitch (ring to SG) and a 1k resistor between the SGoutput from the BOTPCBand the SGpad of the power switch to clip SYNCOUTto 4. 7V : This controller is based mainly on the c
LCD_controller - schematic

ircuit by Thomas Schuhmann & Franz Krause. I added some improvements and simplifications (which I may have seen in other circuits, so credits go to all those nice people that contributed to the homebrew section at stereo3d. com ). PLL circuit fine-tuned for less jitter - Thomas once told me that he just used an out-of-the-box circuit for frequency multiplication, which had a far too wide frequency range (~10 kHz) to be really stable at usual V-sync frequencies (~100 Hz). I restricted the range to approx. 25. 300 Hz and get a rock-steady picture now. Automatic adaptation of generated V-Sync polarity. The original circuit didn`t care for the polarity (positive or negative pulses) of the V-sync signal, but always synchronize to the rising edge of the pulse. My circuit automagically converts the received V-sync signal to positive polarity, and the generated sync signal back to the received polarity, keeping the first edges of received and generated signal in sync regardless of polarity. Combines `the best of both worlds` w. r. t. shutter glasses driving: Like the original Cyberboy controller, I use a (spare from the sync-doubler) flip-flop to get half of the L/R switching frequency to toggle the polarity of the glasses (in contrast to the extra oscillator in the standard 4070-homebrew driver). Unlike the Cyberboy, however, I don`t use an additional negative supply voltage, but instead drive the common line for both LCDs...



Leave Comment

characters left:

New Circuits

.