Signal Meter circuit


Posted on Feb 5, 2014    11064

THE OP-AMP: The Op-Amp used for the signal meter circuit is a TL061. An LF351 works just as well, however and has the same pin layout. If you have a TL062 or similar the differing pin-outs are shown below so that you can design your circuit board successfully. The diagram above shows the pin layout of the TL061 and some alternative op-amps that ca


Signal Meter circuit
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n also be used in the signal meter circuit described on this page. The LF351 op-amp also works in this design and is pin compatible with theTL061. Another pin compatible op-amp that is usually easy to obtain, or that may be knocking about in the `junk box` is the very common LM741. I have not tried an LM741 in this circuit, but I can see no reason why it would not work. Rather than solder any op-amp directly to the circuit board, I would strongly recommend that you use 8 Pin D. I. L. sockets so that the I. C. can be easily inserted and removed. The 2 power sockets mounted to the right of the back panel are the 12v power input sockets (2 are fitted to allow `daisy-chaining` of the power to another unit) NB - the 0 Volts connection between the negative side of the meter movement and the 0 Volts output from the power regulator circuit should not be connected to the metal case or ground. The small socket on the left is the 2. 5mm Jack that allows connection of the signal meter to the radio. You can just see the single grey wire that connects the 2. 5mm socket to the circuit board. The top half of the board accommodates the signal meter components ( Note how relatively small changes in voltage at the lower end of the scale ( in the S1 to S8 range) produce quite noticable swings in the readings, while really quite large changes in signal voltage at the higher end of the scale ( S9 to S+50 ) produce quite small variations in...




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