MicroSimon

  
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This project shows how to create an MB Electronics Simon game clone using an 8-pin PIC12F683 microcontroller. The game includes a full emulation of the original Simon `game 1` and the ability to select from 4 skill levels which control the number of colours you must repeat in a sequence in order to win the game. The project was created for Sparkfu
MicroSimon - schematic

n`s microcontroller competition 2011 and aims to demonstrate a number of useful design techniques which can be used when working with low-pin count microcontrollers. The code is written entirely in C and fits neatly into the 2K of available program flash on the chip. The PCB is only 1. 5 inches square and uses both SMD and through-hole components, however it is perfectly possible to recreate the project using larger components on a breadboard or a small piece of strip-board. The game is powered by a stanard CR2032 3V lithium cell which is mounted on the underside of the game. The design uses the ultra low power standby feature of the microcontroller meaning that no power switch is required. Overall power consumption is kept to a minimum by using the internal oscillator of the PIC running at 4Mhz. The board is a small dual-layer PCB, all components are mounted top-side apart from the battery holder which is mounted on the bottom of the board to save space. I tried to make the board as small as possible whilst still being playable (I have big thumbs!). The in-circuit programming header can be omitted if not required to make the hardware neater looking. The PCB was made using the UV photo-resist technique which allows for good track accuracy even from a hobbyist set up. Here is a picture of the board created in Eagle: The hardware design uses a common microcontroller trick of using a single ADC (Analogue to Digital Converter)...



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