Arduino Power


Posted on Feb 6, 2014    7296

Having your Arduino control higher-power devices like lights, motors, pumps, doors, and many more is one of the most interesting and useful applications you may get involved with. But it can be a little difficult and possibly dangerous when power line voltages are being controlled. There are significant differences in controlling AC power compared


Arduino Power
Click here to download the full size of the above Circuit.

to DC. And there are considerations about different kinds of loads and so forth. This section will cover many of these subjects, show several available devices you can connect to Arduino to control power (examples above), and provide examples of working projects. (Please direct questions, critiques and suggestions to: terry@yourduino. com ) NOTE: Sometimes switching lights, motors, etc. with relays can cause Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). More information about what to do in these cases is available HERE: Get your Arduino plugged into your main computer, and download the Good Old Blink Program. If you need help getting started, go here. You should have the LED on your Arduino blinking ON for 1 second, OFF for 1 second. If you`re pretty familiar with those words and ideas, fine. But if you`d like to learn a little more before we continue, jump over here and then come back. Plug small wires or pins on the ends of wires into the Arduino and then into a "Solderless Breadboard" where other devices can be plugged in and connections made. (Example) Plug a circuit board (usually called a "Shield") on top of Arduino, plugging into most or all Arduino pins. These Shields are usually special-purpose add-ons to Arduino to do things like control robot motors, connect to the Internet, etc. (Example). Plug a special "Sensor Shield" (Example) on top of Arduino. Then you can easily plug cables and other devices into all the Arduino...




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