Lazer Tag Infrared Receivers

  
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So I wasn`t really in the mood of making and coding the timing controller for the PCB laser printer. And I remembered I had this laser tag gun that I took out of optical alignment the last time I took it apart. I figured it wouldn`t be a bad idea to take it apart to do some mods and to fix the alignment again: This is a Nerf (previously Tiger) `La
Lazer Tag Infrared Receivers - schematic

zer Tag" Phoenix LTX tagger. There`s a lot of talk and background on this guy online, so if you`re really interested Google further. This is indeed marketed a toy laser tag gun, but as it turns out, its performance far exceeds most toy laser tag guns. In real-world testing, the range limit of the gun seems to be on the order of 400 feet or so, and it`s pretty trivial to make hits at half that distance (with good aim, of course). So first, a little background on how these guys work: despite their name, most of these taggers don`t use lasers for the actual hit transmission. Instead, they use IR LEDs, much like your infrared TV remotes. In fact, the whole system is essentially a well-mounted TV remote and receiver with optics to keep the beam narrow. So when you`re playing, you actually do need to use the iron sights to really hit anyone reasonably in the game-the aim is fairly realistic. Of course, it`s not perfect, and that`s why I`m making a post about it. The IR receiver is mounted on a little dome on the gun and not on the player`s body. This makes it easy to cheat and cover the dome, and makes the experience a lot less realistic-you`re guarding your gun, not your body. So I figured I`d re-investigate the IR receiver and see if it was reasonable to wire up external sensors. The last time I took the gun apart, I remember there being a couple of issues involving the IR receiver circuit they used and the fact that you...



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