Telegraph Transmitter in the Pilot Radios Radio Design magazine 1930s

  
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TPTG transmitter was transformed into a trendy TNT. You can use your present K-111 power pack for this transmitter as well as for the receiver, and thus save the expense of a separate power supply unit. Build this little transmitter and go `on the air. ` The one-tube short-wave transmitter shown on page 53 of the Volume 3, Number 3 issue of RADIO DESIGN aroused a great deal of interest, and many
Telegraph Transmitter in the Pilot Radios Radio Design magazine 1930s - schematic

readers asked about building this outfit with Pilot parts and using it on a K-111 power pack. The requests for "dope" were so numerous that we built an actual transmitter, following the general description given in The Radio Amateur`s Handbook. It worked without trouble the first time it was turned on, and was so easy to make that we are sure many short-wave fans will find it interesting. A piece of wood 12 inches long and 10 inches wide was used as the baseboard. Any dry piece of lumber is satisfactory ; no expensive bakelite panels or sub-panels are needed. The following parts all of standard Pilot make and available throughout the world were used: The completed transmitter assembled on a board. CF are the by-pass condensers across the filament; CB - the plate blocking condensers. The midget condenser in front of the grid coil is not needed. sic! The parts were arranged as shown in the illustration on this page. In addition to the material listed, the set uses a grid coil consisting of 23 turns of No. 24 cotton covered wire on a one inch tube, and a plate coil consisting of 6 turns of 1/4 inch copper tubing wound 2 1/2 inches in diameter. The grid coil is mounted on a pair of little double-L shaped legs, while the ends of the plate coil are flattened, drilled, and fastened directly to the terminals of the Vaultype condenser. The six binding posts are mounted on a strip of bakelite, which is supported above the edge of...



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